Diseases and Pests in Michigan (MI)

Diplodia Shoot (Tip) Blight

Diplodia tip blight (formerly known as Sphaeropsis tip blight) is a fungal disease that kills the tips of the branches of pines, and less frequently spruce and firs. More…

Eastern Tent Caterpillar

In late spring and early summer, the eastern tent caterpillar creates an unsightly nest or tent in the crotch of branches. The feeding of the larvae in late spring and early summer strips the foliage from trees. More…

Elm Leafminer

Elm leaf miner is a native pest that feeds on the tissues in between the outer layers of elm leaves, causing browning and leaf drop. More…

Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive wood boring beetle from Asia that is predicted to infest all unprotected ash trees in the United States and Canada over the next 20 years. More…

European Elm Scale

European elm scale, Gossyparia spuria, is a soft scale insect that attacks a variety of elm trees as well as hackberry species. Heavy infestations may kill weakened trees and cause branch dieback in healthy trees. More…

European Pine Sawfly

European pine sawfly, Neodiprion sertifer, is an introduced pest that was first found in New Jersey in 1925. It affects a variety of pine species by feeding on the old needles in early spring. More…

Forest Tent Caterpillar

The forest tent caterpillar strips the foliage from trees, builds cocoons on the sides of buildings, and becomes messy when crawling on sidewalks, patios, and driveways where they are frequently squashed More…

Gypsy Moth

Gypsy moth larvae defoliate trees leaving them weakened and vulnerable to secondary fungal and insect invaders. Gypsy moth will affect trees in natural settings, forest plantations, and urban environments, often defoliating thousands of trees in a single outbreak. More…

Hemlock Elongate Scale

Hemlock elongate scale pierces the underside of the needle with its mouthparts and removes fluids from the needle. Trees that are severely infested will exhibit needle yellowing or dropping, thinning canopy, and eventual death. More…

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