Lombardy Poplar Tree (Populus nigra)

  • Broadleafed
  • Deciduous

The Lombardy poplar tree is often used as a windbreak between property lines. Poplars in general are subject to many diseases and insect pests, such as canker and tent caterpillars, which often kill the tree or make it unattractive. These risks, in conjunction with a water-hungry root system, have made Lombardy and other poplars less desirable for landscape use over the years.

  • Alternate Common Name: None
  • Average Height: A lombardy poplar tree averages about 60 feet tall.
  • Average Width: Lombardy poplars have a spread of 10 to 15 feet, upward bending branches start close to the ground
  • Leaf Description: Lombardy poplar leaves are alternate, simple, broadly deltoid (triangular), 2 to 4 inches long, finely serrate-crenate, straight across the base, petiole flattened, shiny dark green above, paler beneath.
  • Bark Description: The lombardy poplar tree has bark that's initially smooth and gray-green, but then becomes darker (gray to nearly black) and irregularly furrowed.
  • Twig Description: Moderate to stout, light brown to yellow-brown, swollen at leaf scars; large, sticky, with reddish brown conical buds.
  • Flowering: Lombardy poplars are dioecious; however, in the variety 'Italica' only male trees are seen; male flowers are slender, reddish to yellow-green, on hanging catkins, 2 to 3 inches long, appearing in early spring. before the leaves
  • Needle or Broadleaf: Broadleafed
  • Comments: Lombardy poplar trees are commonly planted as a windbreak along property lines. Populus species as a whole are subject to many diseases and insect pests, such as canker and tent caterpillars, which often kill the tree or make it unattractive. These risks, in conjunction with a water-hungry root system, have made Populus species less desirable for landscape use.

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